Index

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Issues
Advertisers  
Editorials  
Interviews
Race  
Political Parties
Transitions
Crossword Puzzles

Issues of the Monthly News:

1.    September 1942           

2.    October 1942                
3.    November 1942             
4.    December 1942             
5.    January 1943                 
6.    February 1943               
7.    April 1943                      
8.    May 1943                       
9.    June 1943                      
10.  July 1943                       
11.  September 1943            
12.  October 1943                 
13.  November 1943             
14.  December 1943             
15.  January 1944

ADS

20th Century Realty Co. 25, 27-29
C. N. Agnew, realtor 5-29
Albrecht’s Flowers 8-12, 14-15, 17-29
Anthony Wayne Theater 19-23
Brookfield Dairy 11
Cowan’s Flower Shop 4-21, 25, 28-29
Angelo D’Micantonio, shoemaker 14
Emidio DeJoseph & Son, tailor 4, 6, 8
Philip DeMarse, barber 14
Elite Beauty Shoppe 14-15, 20-22
Espenshades meals 8-9, 15-24, 27-28
General Insurance, Harriett E. Weed 15-23, 26-29
Donald R. Gorham 3, 6-9
Halligan’s baby supplies 29
Hurlock’s Firestone Store 28
Mr. John, hairdresser 23-29
Kenilworth Inn 6-11, 13-15
William H. Kromer, photos 27-28
Miss Love & Miss Watson, music lessons 5-29
Lynam Electric Co. 24-29
Main Line Grill Diner 4, 6-16, 18-29
Domenic Manzi tailor 10-28
Geo. R. Park & Sons, garden tools 4-29
Michael Pinto barber 10-14, 16-29
Radnor HS Juniors, Christmas Cards 27
Rest-Well Tourist Home 1, 3, 8
James W. Rice, insurance 17-21
St. Mary’s Laundry 6, 9
J. B. Simpson, tailor, Phila. 10-11
Watkin’s Tea Room 27-29
Wayne Hardware 5-6, 10-11
Wayne Hotel 5-8
Wayne Printing Co. 10-12, 14-29
Weadley Pharmacy 10
Joseph Y. Wilson, Lawn Mower repair 19-22
The Woman’s Exchange, handicraft, cakes 16-29



EDITORIALS
July 1943 p 4:  Is This Soldier Right?  Defends miners’ strike.  (But cf, January 1944 p 1, Extra, Philadelphia. Jan 7

          criticizing strikes.
October 1943 p 4:  W. W. Adams, Manpower.  Shortage and remedies.
November 1943 p 4:  W. W. Adams, Post War Planning.  Need to plan for a better world.
December 1943 p 4:  W. W. Adams, Work For All.  Help meet postwar needs.
January 1944 p 5:  WWA, Worse than War.  Losing the peace would be worse.
February 1944 p 5:  WWA, Great Men!  Need greatness in character as well as science.
March 1944 p 4:  WWA, The Fruits of War.  More war.
April 1944 p 5:  WWA, Facing the Truth.  Drink, corruption and waste.  War aims?
May 1944 p 5:  Wm. W. Adams, The First Front.  Selfishness, dumbness, blindness.
June 1944 p 5:  WWA, D Day.  6 days ago. 
September 1944 p 2:  Will Adams, Postwar Japan.  Don’t leave Hirohito in power.
          WWA, Young American Soldiers.  Form a world federation.
          G. Sprague, Rationing.  Swindles too easy; sometimes unnecessary.
November 1944 p 1:  WWA, Democracy Works.  Against compulsory military training.
          p 2:  WWA, Election Gains.  We had one; model for other countries; isolationists are defeated; jobs for all.
January 1945 p 1-2:  WA, Do We Want Compulsory Military Training?  No.
          P 5:  Faith.  Don’t approach problems of peace with doubt.
April 1945 p 1:  WA, World Federation.  Supportive.
June 1945 pp 1-2, 4:  Nell Walton, China—Communistic or Democratic.  Based on June Readers’ Digest, “The

           Fate of the World is at Stake in China.” 
September 1945 p 2:  WWA, The World Today.  Serve “the needy all around us.”
          WA, Atomic Power—Constructive or Destructive?  Keep secret until reveal to all; peacetime uses of atomic  

          power very promising.
October 1945 p 2:  WWA, Murdered—at Home.  Veteran seeking job asked nationality.
          WA, World Peace.  Think internationally; salute UN flag, etc.
November 1945 p 2:  WWA, Our First Need.  Unity in common purposes.
          WA, Conscription.  Truman proposed it in peace time; we oppose it.
January 1946 p 2:  Walter E. Myer, Ruling the Spirit.  All need to learn self control.  From the American Observer
          WWA, Imperialism.  Americans have been anti-imperialist, yet are involved in imperialist activities all over the    

          world.



INTERVIEWS
March 1944 p 5:  Will Adams, Mr. Beatty, Athletics in the High School
June 1944 pp 4-5:  Bert Adams, Byron Saam, radio announcer for Philadelphia baseball.
September 1944 pp 5-6:  Bert and Will Adams, Connie Mack, Philadelphia A’s manager.
November 1944 p 5:  Will Adams, Dr. E. W. Nickel.  Disney’s birds imitator.
September 1945 p 7:  WA, W. C. Jackson.  Innovative lumberman in Akron, Ohio.
          P 7:  Adams Family, Don McNeil and the Breakfast Club.



RACE
October 1943 p 4:  W. W. Adams, Manpower.  “Why not use colored men?  Like it or not, this issue must be faced.  The four freedoms!  Freedom for whom?  Will democracy work?  Is America open to all regardless of race or religion?”
November 1943 p 5:  Mr. McDaffy.  Negro maid, but no put down.
June 1945 p 4:  Baker, Counting Eggs.  Negro jargon
September 1945 p 10:  Nell Walton, Jose and Mose.  Stereotypes blacks.
October 1945 p 2:  Cartoon, nationality.
October 1945 p 2:  WWA, Murdered—at Home.  Veteran seeking job asked nationality.



POLITICAL PARTIES
January 1945 p 5:  Faith.  Republicans lacked it in the last election.



TRANSITIONS
Print:  All typing except name of paper drawn by hand:  Through July 1943.
          Mast head by print guide, September 1943 through November 1945.
          Headlines by print guide, September 1945 through November 1945.
          Printing press, January 1946.
Publisher:  Mrs. Delaney, issues 1-2; W. W. Adams, issues 3-4, 1942.
          Miss Harriet E. Weed, Suburban Mimeographing, Jan. 1943 – Nov. 1944.
          Our own Speed-O-Print mimeograph, Jan.-Nov. 1945; Wayne Printing Co., Jan. 1946 (printed by a student in

          Shop at Radnor High School).
Printed photo:  November 1945 p 4:  Donna Atwood, professional ice skater.
Staff, all issues:  Editor-in-chief, Will Adams; Sports Editor, Bert Adams; News Editor, W. W. Adams.
Amusement Editor:  Sept. 1942-April 1944, none; May-Sept. 1944, Janet Staley; Nov. 1944-Sept. 1945, Sue

          Eakins; Oct. 1945-Jan. 1946, none.
Art Editor:  Sept-Oct. 1942, Ann Beatty; Nov. 1942-Jan. 1946, Nell Walton.
Business Manager:  Sept. 1942-March 1944, none; April 1944-Nov. 1945, Hal Sangree; Jan. 1946, none.
Assistant Business Manager:  Sept. 1942-Sept. 1944, none; Nov. 1944-Nov. 1945 , Sylvia Beebe; Jan. 1946, none.
Circulation Manager:  Sept. 1942-March 1944 , Bob Breckenridge; April 1944-Jan. 1945,  Richard Cody; April

          1945-Jan. 1946, none.
Printer:  Sept-Oct. 1942, Nancy Delany; Nov. 1942, Mrs. Delany; Dec. 1942-Nov. 1944,
          Suburban Mimeographing; Jan. 1945-Nov. 1945, Own Speed-O-Print; Jan. 1946, Wayne Printing Company

          (printed in shop at Radnor High School).
Science Editor:  Sept. 1942-Sept. 1945, none; Oct. 1945-Jan. 1946, Bob Lawson.



CROSSWORD PUZZLES:  One in each issue, created by Beulah R. Adams. 
Size: 
7 x 7:  Sept. 1942-June 1943, Oct.-Nov. 1943;
9 x 9:  Sept. 1943, Dec. 1943-June 1944, Nov. 1944-June 1945, Oct. 1945-Jan. 1946;
11 x 11:  Sept. 1944, Sept. 1945.

16. February 1944

17. March 1944

18. April 1944

19. May 1944

20. June 1944

21. September 1944

22. November 1944

23. January 1945

24. April 1945

25. June 1945

26. September 1945

27. October 1945

28. November 1945

29. January 1946